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Tanyfron Housing Co-operative

I have been told this is a lovely place with a great community which strives to live sustainably. Options for volunteering available through working holidays, learn a new skill.

Permaculture Design Course 2016/17

Design 4 A.C.T.I.O.N (Active Community Transformation In Our Neighbourhoods) is a different kind of permaculture course – positive design for your life, your community and your world by empowering the genius inside all of us! D4A is about regenerative learning, enabling individuals, organisations and communities to come together over six weekends to create empowering solutions to the real world challenges we are all facing in these times of change.

Adapted from the Permaculture Association (Britain)’s PDC core curriculum, this is a person-centred, fun, lively and inclusive course, exploring and utilising concepts such as Systems Thinking, Holistic Design, Community Empowerment, ‘Whole Person’ Health, Skill Sharing, Critical Thinking, Appreciative Inquiry, Right Livelihoods and much more. This course will be hosted at Furtherfield Commons in Finsbury Park, a new and exciting partnership project at the cutting edges of dynamic cultural change: “We believe that through creative and critical engagement with practices in art and technology people are inspired and enabled to become active co-creators of their cultures and societies.” Venue: Furtherfield Commons, Finsbury Park, London The course will be taught by Graham Burnett (Dip. Perm Des), Claire White (Dip. Perm Des), James Taylor (MSc. Human Ecology) and some great guest teachers.

Dates: 6 weekends, October 2016 – March 2017: 29 – 30 Oct 2016 19 – 20 Nov 2016 10 – 11 Dec 2016 14 – 15 Jan 2017 11 – 12 Feb 2017 11 – 12 March 2017 Cost: £390 – Individual, concessionary rate (unwaged) £590 – Individual, waged (income less than £25k) £790 – Individual, waged (income more than £25k) £790 –

Sponsored/organisation rate Book on the course at http://springintoactionpdc.blogspot.co.uk

d4a-16_17-flyer

Council continues to lead low carbon agenda | Southend-on-Sea Borough Council

Published Wednesday, 14th September 2016

Solar Panels, Temple Sutton, Primary school, Eastern Avenue, Southend. Picture Steve O'Connell 22-10-15

Council driven energy projects over the last eighteen months have had such an environmental impact that they have kept the equivalent of 700 cars off the road for one year.

Over 3,500 tonnes of CO2 have been saved, and provided £700,000 worth of income and savings to the council.

The CO2 savings are also equivalent to an average car being driven non-stop for nearly 16 years or the average energy needs of a house being met for 269 years.

The great success of the work is part of the council’s Low Carbon Energy and Sustainability Strategy (LCESS) that was approved in 2015, and will be discussed next week (Cabinet, 20th September – item 21).

The annual update report charts the major progress made since the strategy was approved. Since then the council has started £19m worth of energy projects, including the ongoing installation of LED street lighting across the Borough, pilot solar panel projects at Temple Sutton School and Southend Adult Community College and other energy efficiency projects on council properties.

Alongside these projects, Southend Energy was launched in May 2015, delivering average savings of £276 per household to the 5,000 now signed up to the scheme, helping to save £1.3m locally and deliver 1,200 tonnes of CO2 savings thanks to the environmental policy within the tariff.

The report also looks to the future, with the council looking for innovative opportunities to generate energy from tidal and wave power on the Pier, put more solar panelling on council buildings, and continue work on local schools using Temple Sutton as a model.  The council’s energy team are also keeping abreast of new technology and innovations and looking at ways to better manage surface water and drainage with our partners like Anglian Water.

Cllr Ann Holland, Executive Councillor for Culture, Tourism and the Economy, says: “This report shows that we are really leading the field in this area, and continue to seek innovative ways to reduce carbon emissions, be more energy efficient and help to save ourselves and local residents money.

“I am delighted that the council have been able to carry out so many low carbon projects including the installation of LED street lighting across the Borough and working with local schools to deliver solar energy.  There are further exciting times ahead, and the energy team continue to stay ahead of the game, ensuring they are on top of innovations as they continually come forwards.  I look forward to working up the detail on more pioneering future schemes that are good for the environment and good for both the council and local residents finances.”

Background to projects

A total of 754 solar panels have been installed on the roof of Temple Sutton School, providing 180,000kwh a year – around three quarters of the school’s electricity demand. Southend Adult Community College, meanwhile, has fitted 401 panels to their roofs, providing 90,000 kwh a year, approximately a third of demand.

The solar installations are just one part of a large investment programme in energy savings and generation at the sites, which l also includes such measures as biomass boilers, ground-source heat pumps, LED lighting, additional insulation, motor controls, heating controls and double glazed windows at the school.  It is estimated that 437 tonnes of CO2 will be saved every year from the new measures – the equivalent to 219 hot air balloons filled with CO2.

The initial £1.9m investment is being made by the Council on the school and college’s behalf.  The school and college will then use part of the energy cost savings to pay for the investment over the long term. Additional savings can then be used by the school and college to reinvest into education.

See the website for further information.

Are you 15-19? or know someone who is. Then this project could interest you

Dear All

Please find details of a Project being run by the Centre for Sustainable Energy (CSE) that may be of interest to any young people you know.
en-form

Bright Green Future is our new programme for young
people, aged 15-19, to encourage them to get involved in the energy
sector. They’ll receive training, run local projects, take part in work
placements and more, all of which will help them on a path towards
becoming a future environmental leader. Read more at www.bright-green-future.org.uk.

As it’s a UK wide project we really need to ensure that we spread the word
across all regions, so we are hoping you can help by ensuring that your
contacts and networks are aware of the programme. You could also
suggest any networks or contacts in your area that you think it would be
worthwhile us getting in touch with. We’re hoping to have 50 young
people, from all over the UK, signed up to take part from September.
There is an application deadline of Sunday 17 July, so we need to act
quickly to ensure as many relevant people as possible are informed.

Please get back to me to suggest any contacts or get in touch on bgf@cse.org.uk if you have any queries about the project.

Thank you in advance for your help, and do get in touch if we can return the
favour by publicising any of your activities in our monthly newsletter.

Masterclass event: a new conversation with the centre-right about energy and climate change‏

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Join our masterclass: Wed 11 May, London

Climate change cannot be the concern of a relatively small number of committed environmentalists – it demands a response from across society, and in particular, from across the political spectrum. Climate change is often perceived as a left-wing issue and many on the centre-right have felt alienated from the climate conversation. If we are to break through this political barrier, the values and concerns of centre-right audiences must be adequately addressed when communicating about climate and energy.

This masterclass is designed for policymakers, advocates and campaigners from across the political spectrum whose work involves engaging people on the centre-right with climate and energy issues. Focussed around small ‘c’ conservative values, this interactive and participatory event lead by George Marshall will provide participants with a toolkit for generating constructive conversations and compelling campaigns, based on our growing body of work in this field.

For more details and to register →

Learn more about our Climate Visuals resource and our Faith project

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Images are a crucial part of communication and storytelling. They have the power to reach people in ways that the written word can’t. And yet research into how people interpret and respond to climate change images has been limited to a handful of studies.

Our Climate Visuals project is the first of its kind, filling a critical gap – an evidence-based report into what makes for effective visual communication with an accompanying image library resource.  Last week we ran a webinar presenting our 7 principles for visual climate change communication, which generated lots of interest from participants from across the world.

If you have been using or plan to use the insights from Climate Visuals in your work, please tell us how! We are collecting examples of this project’s impact and would love to hear from you – please simply reply to this email. Thank you very much for your feedback.

Watch our Climate Visuals webinar →

On Monday, religious leaders delivered an interfaith climate change statement to the President of the UN General Assembly at an official event in New York. Faith shapes the values and behaviour of billions of people. We believe that for climate communicators both within and outside faith communities, there is a need to better understand the language that engages people of faith.  Join our webinar on 26 April to find out more about our international multifaith research – in particular, five narratives about climate change that work across faiths.

Register for our faith webinar →

 

Climate conversations: more than magic words

Recently there were some interesting reactions to a paper in Nature Climate Change on the value of framing climate messages. This opinion piece challenged the efficacy of using different frames to communicate climate change – suggesting that ‘magic words’ do not have any effect on people’s deep-rooted values and worldviews.

Framing messages about climate change in ways that resonate with people’s values is one of our key areas of expertise and, we argue, a crucial first step in building wider and deeper public engagement. As we highlighted in our own opinion piece, it’s true that there are no ‘magic words’ – but there are definitely better and worse ways of starting a conversation, and using the right language is about starting a productive dialogue, not ‘winning an argument.’ Change begins with conversations.

Read our blog on framing →

Speaking of conversations, the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), the figurehead for climate science at a global level, has recently been having discussions about how to communicate their findings more effectively. We attended and contributed to the first IPCC meeting dedicated to communication, where it was resolved to improve the communication of the IPCC’s findings through much closer engagement with communications expertise – a proposal we advocated for and are delighted to see.

Kind regards,
Jamie Clarke
Executive Director

Just Ride Southend

just ride southend

Just Ride Southend runs regular drop-in inclusive cycling sessions for people of all ages and abilities in a safe, traffic-free environment.

 

Just Ride Southend runs regular drop-in inclusive cycling sessions for people of all ages and abilities. Based at Southend Leisure & Tennis Centre at Garon Park. We provide a safe traffic-free experience with our specially adapted cycles to cater for all disabilities or health conditions. So please feel free to come and sample our friendly social atmosphere and take some healthy exercise!

 

Public Sessions:
(Spring schedule)
Tuesday 10.00am – 12.00pm
Wednesday 10.00am – 12.00pm
Saturday 10.00am – 13.00pm

 

Visit the website or facebook page for more info.

Tree-mendous gift from OVO energy helps to green local park | Southend-on-Sea Borough Council

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Children from Thorpe Greenways School have helped plant 250 trees in Southchurch Park East as the Council seeks to make the borough cleaner and greener.

The trees have been donated to the Council by OVO, the Council’s partner in its own energy initiative, Southend Energy.

The tree planting comes as the Council prepares to launch ‘Make Southend Sparkle’, a pioneering initiative to bring together community groups, businesses and the council to make our neighbourhoods cleaner and greener.

Mary Betson, Executive Cllr for Enterprise, Tourism and Economic Development, said: “I am delighted that we were able to use our links with OVO through Southend Energy – which has already attracted over 3,000 local customers in less than a year – to introduce further greenery into a local park.

“We are very grateful to them for donating these trees and I look forward to more of them being planted across the Borough.”

Reg Platt, Senior Manager from OVO said: “We pride ourselves on our green credentials, providing 33 per cent renewable energy as standard in both OVO’s and Southend Energy’s tariffs, along with our competitively priced Greener plans which are 100 per cent renewable.

“That is why we were delighted to support the Council by donating these trees as it prepares to launch its Make Southend Sparkle campaign.”

Since its launch in May last year, OVO has saved over 3,000 customers an average of £287 on their energy bills whilst increasing the percentage of renewable energy these households use.

To find out if you can save, please visit www.southendenergy.co.uk